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Indicative
01-31-2016, 03:55 AM
Greetings, fellow forumers.

What do you think about the new technology called the 5G?

What is 5G?
http://i2.cdn.turner.com/money/dam/assets/150518144020-5g-wireless-table-780x439.jpg

5G will be the fifth generation of wireless network technology. 5G will likely be defined in 2018, and the standards will codified sometime in 2019. The standards will determine which wireless technologies can be called "5G," as well as what its characteristics must include, such as how fast it will be.

Here's the elevator pitch: 5G has the potential to offer speeds up to 40 times faster than 4G -- fast enough to stream "8K" video in 3-D or download a 3-D movie in about 6 seconds (on 4G, it would take 6 minutes), smarter and less power-hungry than 4G, enabling a slew of new wireless gadgets. It will let us have faster smartphones, more smart-home devices and longer-lasting wearable gizmos. It will also have ultra-low latency, meaning that it could drastically reduce the amount of time it takes for the network to respond to your commands. That could give the appearance of much faster loading websites, apps, videos and messages.

https://ec.europa.eu/digital-agenda/sites/digital-agenda/files/5g_joint_declaration_-_what_5g_is_about_2800px.jpg

How will it work?
http://iqglobal.intel.com/wp-content/uploads/Intel-5G-IDF-Infographic-FINAL-8-12-15.jpg

5G experimentation is taking place in super-high frequencies -- as high as 73,000 MHz. Today's cell phone networks broadcast signal in a range of 700 MHz to 3,500 MHz.

The advantage is that they're capable of providing faster data speeds. The disadvantage is that they travel much shorter distances and they can't easily penetrate walls. That means thousands -- perhaps even millions -- of mini cell towers, or "small cells" would need to be placed inside every home and potentially every room.

That presents some problems. How can cell phone companies possibly process all that data? There are companies, such as Google's recently acquired Alpental, that are working on those "backhaul" issues. But they're not so close to a solution, according to Akshay Sharma, wireless infrastructure analyst at Gartner.

That's why 5G might complement 4G, rather than outright replace it. In buildings and in crowded areas, 5G might provide a speed boost. But when you're driving down the highway, 4G could be your only option -- at least for a while.

When is 5G coming?
http://www.analysysmason.com/PageFiles/47192/2_Figure1_web.png

The industry's consensus is that it will run 5G experiments in South Korea during the 2018 Winter Olympics, with mass deployments beginning sometime in 2020.

Yet Verizon has said that it is working on 5G technology with the aim of bringing it to market much sooner -- as early as 2017.

Eviil
01-31-2016, 03:57 AM
Who are you? 0.0

Ivy389
01-31-2016, 03:59 AM
Just five years after the first 4G smartphone hit the market, the wireless industry is already preparing for 5G.

Each of the four nationwide cell phone carriers, as well as smartphone chipmakers and the major network equipment companies are working on developing 5G network technology for their customers.

There are many significant hurdles that all the industry players have to clear before you'll see a little 5G symbol next to the signal bars on your smartphone screen. For example, it has yet to be determined what 5G even means, let alone what it will look like and when it will get here.

But as consumers use up rapidly growing amounts of 4G bandwidth watching streaming videos on their phones, 5G will soon become a necessity. As telecom engineers work furiously to develop 5G technology, we're getting a clearer picture of the who, what, where, when and why of 5G.

What is 5G?
http://i2.cdn.turner.com/money/dam/assets/150518144020-5g-wireless-table-780x439.jpg

The "G" in 3G, 4G and 5G stands for "generation." So 5G will be the fifth generation of wireless network technology.

The standards for 5G have not yet been set. According to Bill Smith, president of AT&T's (T, Tech30) network operations, 5G will likely be defined in 2018, and the standards for 5G will codified sometime in 2019 by the standards-setting International Telecommunication Union, a branch of the United Nations. The standards will determine which wireless technologies can be called "5G," as well as what its characteristics must include, such as how fast it will be.

Still, it's possible to make a very educated guess about what 5G will look like based on the emerging 5G technologies that the wireless industry is experimenting with.

Here's the elevator pitch: 5G will be faster, smarter and less power-hungry than 4G, enabling a slew of new wireless gadgets. 5G will let us have faster smartphones, more smart-home devices and longer-lasting wearable gizmos. Another characteristic of 5G is that it will have ultra-low latency, meaning that it could drastically reduce the amount of time it takes for the network to respond to your commands. That could give the appearance of much faster loading websites, apps, videos and messages.

https://ec.europa.eu/digital-agenda/sites/digital-agenda/files/5g_joint_declaration_-_what_5g_is_about_2800px.jpg

How fast will 5G be?

http://i2.cdn.turner.com/money/dam/assets/150908113155-4g-vs-5g-780x439.jpg

5G has the potential to offer speeds up to 40 times faster than 4G -- fast enough to stream "8K" video in 3-D or download a 3-D movie in about 6 seconds (on 4G, it would take 6 minutes). Unfortunately for consumers, there's a difference between lab experiments and reality. Peak speeds are fun to dream about, but in the real world, actual speeds are much slower than promised.

Nokia (NOK), one of the biggest 5G players, believes that its 5G technology will allow for real-world speeds of about 100 Megabits per second when the network is most congested -- that's about four times faster than 4G's top speed.

How will it work?
http://iqglobal.intel.com/wp-content/uploads/Intel-5G-IDF-Infographic-FINAL-8-12-15.jpg

A lot of the wireless companies' 5G experimentation is taking place in super-high frequencies -- as high as 73,000 MHz. Today's cell phone networks broadcast signal in a range of 700 MHz to 3,500 MHz.

The advantage of high-frequency signals is that they're capable of providing significantly faster data speeds. The disadvantage is that they travel much shorter distances and they can't easily penetrate walls. That means thousands -- perhaps even millions -- of mini cell towers, or "small cells" would need to be placed on top of every lamp post, every building, inside every home and potentially every room.

That presents a host of problems. How can cell phone companies possibly process all that data? There are companies, such as Google's recently acquired Alpental, that are working on those "backhaul" issues. But they're not so close to a solution, according to Akshay Sharma, wireless infrastructure analyst at Gartner.

That's why 5G might complement 4G, rather than outright replace it. In buildings and in crowded areas, 5G might provide a speed boost. But when you're driving down the highway, 4G could be your only option -- at least for a while.

When is 5G coming?
http://www.analysysmason.com/PageFiles/47192/2_Figure1_web.png

None of these questions are going to be answered any time soon. The industry's consensus is that it will run 5G experiments in South Korea during the 2018 Winter Olympics, with mass deployments beginning sometime in 2020.

Yet Verizon (VZ, Tech30) has said that it is working on 5G technology with the aim of bringing it to market much sooner -- as early as 2017.

With all the questions surrounding 5G and all the wrinkles that need to be ironed out, it's exceedingly unlikely that anything Verizon does will be widely deployed. For example, the smartphone makers will need to develop chips that are capable of sending and receiving 5G signal without driving costs significantly higher.

Sources:
- CNN
- Wikipedia
- The Guardian

Uhh..seriously?
Thanks though.

Indicative
01-31-2016, 04:00 AM
Who are you? 0.0

A forumer, just like you.

AlexKat
01-31-2016, 04:02 AM
this post is so long

im too lazy to read it

smartsmile
01-31-2016, 04:08 AM
Uhh..seriously?
Thanks though.

jesus please put that in a spoiler next time

Indicative
01-31-2016, 04:10 AM
Uhh..seriously?
Thanks though.

Just want to share an interesting tech news with you guys.

Indicative
01-31-2016, 04:32 AM
jesus please put that in a spoiler next time


this post is so long

im too lazy to read it

I've made the summary. Feel free to read! :)

Trolled
01-31-2016, 04:53 AM
Well, its good to know things up-to-date.

Indicative
01-31-2016, 05:06 AM
damn do you all have the attention span of nats?
A good discussion/cool thread comes up and its too much because its not as short and meme filled as an AMA thread. Even the colorful pictures arent enough.

Actually I've read that an average human have the attention span to read up to 593 words. So, I have made this thread below 600 words.

Indicative
01-31-2016, 05:11 AM
The attention span of reading less than a page in a novel? Somehow that doesnt seem accurate.

Hmm, I guess so. I guess 111 words or less are enough for a discussion.

http://www.statisticbrain.com/attention-span-statistics/

IceKane
01-31-2016, 05:49 AM
Greetings, fellow forumers.

What do you think about the new technology called the 5G?

What is 5G?
http://i2.cdn.turner.com/money/dam/assets/150518144020-5g-wireless-table-780x439.jpg

5G will be the fifth generation of wireless network technology. 5G will likely be defined in 2018, and the standards will codified sometime in 2019. The standards will determine which wireless technologies can be called "5G," as well as what its characteristics must include, such as how fast it will be.

Here's the elevator pitch: 5G has the potential to offer speeds up to 40 times faster than 4G -- fast enough to stream "8K" video in 3-D or download a 3-D movie in about 6 seconds (on 4G, it would take 6 minutes), smarter and less power-hungry than 4G, enabling a slew of new wireless gadgets. It will let us have faster smartphones, more smart-home devices and longer-lasting wearable gizmos. It will also have ultra-low latency, meaning that it could drastically reduce the amount of time it takes for the network to respond to your commands. That could give the appearance of much faster loading websites, apps, videos and messages.

https://ec.europa.eu/digital-agenda/sites/digital-agenda/files/5g_joint_declaration_-_what_5g_is_about_2800px.jpg

How will it work?
http://iqglobal.intel.com/wp-content/uploads/Intel-5G-IDF-Infographic-FINAL-8-12-15.jpg

5G experimentation is taking place in super-high frequencies -- as high as 73,000 MHz. Today's cell phone networks broadcast signal in a range of 700 MHz to 3,500 MHz.

The advantage is that they're capable of providing faster data speeds. The disadvantage is that they travel much shorter distances and they can't easily penetrate walls. That means thousands -- perhaps even millions -- of mini cell towers, or "small cells" would need to be placed inside every home and potentially every room.

That presents some problems. How can cell phone companies possibly process all that data? There are companies, such as Google's recently acquired Alpental, that are working on those "backhaul" issues. But they're not so close to a solution, according to Akshay Sharma, wireless infrastructure analyst at Gartner.

That's why 5G might complement 4G, rather than outright replace it. In buildings and in crowded areas, 5G might provide a speed boost. But when you're driving down the highway, 4G could be your only option -- at least for a while.

When is 5G coming?
http://www.analysysmason.com/PageFiles/47192/2_Figure1_web.png

The industry's consensus is that it will run 5G experiments in South Korea during the 2018 Winter Olympics, with mass deployments beginning sometime in 2020.

Yet Verizon has said that it is working on 5G technology with the aim of bringing it to market much sooner -- as early as 2017.

Sounds like something that requires quantum qubits...

Paintlesss
01-31-2016, 06:10 AM
Well we wont be seeing 5g for a while (No I didnt read I skimmed it :3)

well anyone that isnt part of verizon

Dinobones62
01-31-2016, 09:56 AM
Greetings, fellow forumers.

What do you think about the new technology called the 5G?

What is 5G?
http://i2.cdn.turner.com/money/dam/assets/150518144020-5g-wireless-table-780x439.jpg

5G will be the fifth generation of wireless network technology. 5G will likely be defined in 2018, and the standards will codified sometime in 2019. The standards will determine which wireless technologies can be called "5G," as well as what its characteristics must include, such as how fast it will be.

Here's the elevator pitch: 5G has the potential to offer speeds up to 40 times faster than 4G -- fast enough to stream "8K" video in 3-D or download a 3-D movie in about 6 seconds (on 4G, it would take 6 minutes), smarter and less power-hungry than 4G, enabling a slew of new wireless gadgets. It will let us have faster smartphones, more smart-home devices and longer-lasting wearable gizmos. It will also have ultra-low latency, meaning that it could drastically reduce the amount of time it takes for the network to respond to your commands. That could give the appearance of much faster loading websites, apps, videos and messages.

https://ec.europa.eu/digital-agenda/sites/digital-agenda/files/5g_joint_declaration_-_what_5g_is_about_2800px.jpg

How will it work?
http://iqglobal.intel.com/wp-content/uploads/Intel-5G-IDF-Infographic-FINAL-8-12-15.jpg

5G experimentation is taking place in super-high frequencies -- as high as 73,000 MHz. Today's cell phone networks broadcast signal in a range of 700 MHz to 3,500 MHz.

The advantage is that they're capable of providing faster data speeds. The disadvantage is that they travel much shorter distances and they can't easily penetrate walls. That means thousands -- perhaps even millions -- of mini cell towers, or "small cells" would need to be placed inside every home and potentially every room.

That presents some problems. How can cell phone companies possibly process all that data? There are companies, such as Google's recently acquired Alpental, that are working on those "backhaul" issues. But they're not so close to a solution, according to Akshay Sharma, wireless infrastructure analyst at Gartner.

That's why 5G might complement 4G, rather than outright replace it. In buildings and in crowded areas, 5G might provide a speed boost. But when you're driving down the highway, 4G could be your only option -- at least for a while.

When is 5G coming?
http://www.analysysmason.com/PageFiles/47192/2_Figure1_web.png

The industry's consensus is that it will run 5G experiments in South Korea during the 2018 Winter Olympics, with mass deployments beginning sometime in 2020.

Yet Verizon has said that it is working on 5G technology with the aim of bringing it to market much sooner -- as early as 2017.

Nice copying and paste

proman340
01-31-2016, 10:02 AM
Will it come out with iPhone 7?

xlightswitch
01-31-2016, 12:13 PM
Too bad, 5G can't penetrate walls. );